Can I Grow St Augustine Grass Seed Without Sod?

By | April 11, 2017
St. Augustine grass sod plugs

For many peoples who are aiming to cut these costs of a new yard, they will look at choices to planting their new garden with yard seed rather than purchasing roll on sod from the farm. The concern, so lots of people ask is, can St Augustine grass grow from seed?

St. Augustine grass seed sod plugs

St. Augustine grass sod or plugs

Yard grasses fall into two classifications: northern cool-season lawns and southern warm-season grasses. Grasses from each classification need different quantities of water and different types of fertilizer. Each classification likewise has its pest and disease concerns. St. Augustine lawn (Stenotaphrum secundatum) is thought about a warm-season yard and is ideally suited to a Mediterranean climate where it is damp and cold along the coast, yet hot and dry in inland valleys.

The finest time to plant St. Augustine lawn seed is from March up until September. Warm-season grasses, such as St. Augustine, grow in the warmer climates discovered in the southern United States. Even with temperate winter seasons, St. Augustine goes inactive during cooler winter season months, so if the year-round color is desired, St. Augustine yard need to be interspersed with other types of yearly lawns.

St. Augustine yard must not be planted in locations where the temperature level drops listed below freezing in the winter season. The seed flourishes in temperature levels that hover around 85 to 90 degrees, however, has a hard time when temps fall below 40 to 50 degrees for an extended amount of occasions. Although states in the southern portion of the country experience cooler temperature levels, they do not last long enough to cause enduring damage to lawns and golf courses seeded with this type of grass.

St. Augustine turf does not usually produce viable seeds like other kinds of yards do. That's the factor you will not find seeds offered. St. Augustine grass must be developed vegetatively using sod or plugs. April and May would be exceptional months to lay sod or plant plugs to develop a new lawn or repair work damage done to a St. Augustine yard.

St Augustine grass is notoriously bad at growing from seed, and this is why we can not discover St Augustine grass seed for sale anywhere around in the stores. This is also why St Augustine sod farmers will never harvest their entire crop of St Augustine lawn, however, will always leave strips of grass left behind for the new crop of St Augustine lawn to grow from. In this regard, St Augustine turf can not be grown from seed either by the grass farmer or the house owner with any degree of success, neither for that reason be a waste of time even to try it, or would otherwise be exceptionally ineffective to do so.

St. Augustine turf is a sturdy variety of ground cover that carries out extremely well in the southern and gulf coast states. This type of grass seed produces lush, green yards with a soft, carpet-like feel. It is perfect for both golf courses and yards.

Benefits St Augustine Grass:
1. Excellent Heat Tolerance
2. Moderate Nitrogen Requirement
3. Good Drought Tolerance
4. Outstanding Shade Tolerance
5. Wear Tolerance Is Fair
6. Typical Time Frame For Facility Of Root Bed And Complete
Lawn Growth
7. Medium Water Requirements
8. Coarse Leaf Texture
9. Spreads Utilizing Above Ground Shoots (Called Stolons) That Radiate Outwards

Maintenance St. Augustine Lawn

St. Augustine grass has broad, coarse leaves and stems that are vast and flat. It proliferates during the warm, summer season and will become inactive as the weather condition ends up being cooler, triggering it to turn brown and development to cease. With its blue-green shade, this type of turf develops a rich, thick yard with a thick grass base looking like a fine turf carpet. This particular grass seed grows extremely fast and needs regular mowing to keep it looking complete and plush.

For continued development and green color, St. Augustine lawn needs regular watering and fertilizing. If you find insect infestations, you may have to use pesticides. Water freshly seeded lawns numerous times a day for short periods for a minimum of a week to assist the seed settle. When you see root joints, cut back watering to as soon as a day for another week, then 2 to 3 times a week must be enough. Professional lawn care professionals recommend utilizing less than 4 pounds of abundant nitrogen fertilizer for every 1,000 square feet. Excessive watering and too much fertilizer can develop and abundance of thatch that can build up and hinder development.

If you discover insect invasions, you may have to use pesticides. Make sure to follow the directions on the plan closely to avoid damaging the existing grass when using any herbicide or insecticide regularly. Extreme amounts of thatch can lead to insect infestation and the spread of diseases that mostly impact this type of lawn if enabled to stay in the yard. Pre-emergent herbicides can also damage this particular breed of turf. 2,4-D, MSMA and other herbicides in the pre-emergent family can straight affect the seed's development and, in some cases, damage the plant base beyond repair. Ask a plant professional at a local greenhouse or call the info number on the back of the package when to use a particular product or just how much to use.

Conclusion:

Yard grasses fall into two classifications: northern cool-season lawns and southern warm-season yards. St. Augustine grass (Stenotaphrum secundatum) is thought about a warm-season lawn and is ideally suited to a Mediterranean climate where it is damp and cold along the coast, yet hot and dry in inland valleys. Even with temperate winter seasons, St. Augustine goes dormant throughout colder winter months, so if the year-round color is desired, St. Augustine lawn ought to be sprinkled with other types of annual turfs.

St. Augustine grass does not produce practical seeds like other types of grasses do. St Augustine lawn is infamously bad at growing from seed, and this is why we can not find St Augustine grass seed for sale anywhere around in the stores.

The sod farmer cannot do it - it's too tough, and would be too pricey and time-consuming.

The St Augustine grass breeder cannot do it - it's frequently too challenging for the majority of them too.

The house owner can't do it - it's too hard

For the property owner desiring to grow a brand-new St Augustine grass yard from seed, they would be best to look at other low-cost choices to grow a brand-new St Augustine grass lawn from either St Augustine runners of a recognized and respected grass range or St Augustine plugs. Growing a new St Augustine yard from seed is simply too difficult.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *